All Posts by Kevin Ward

About the Author

Jack Joseph Puig and Martin Bomer

Martin with JJPOne of our long-time mixers and members Martin Bomer got to meet and hang out with JJP recently. ¬†Thanks Martin for wearing the MixCoach swag ūüôā

Three ways to become a more consistent mixer

Let me ask a question‚Ķ do you think that McDonald’s has the best hamburgers in the world? I don’t. I make a pretty mean burger myself.

mcdSo why do billions of people go to McDonald’s to eat?

No matter where you are in the world, you will find McDonald’s on some busy corner packed with hungry patrons.

I think the reason McDonald’s has been so successful is consistency. No matter where in this world you go to get a big Mac, it’s going to taste about the same as anywhere else.

It’s consistent.

Here are three ways that you can become more consistent in your mixing.

Use references mixes

I know you’ve heard me talk about this time after time, but it is THAT important. Our ears change over time. Not just a lifetime. They can change over the course of a day.

I‚Äôve worked with ‚Äúchallenged‚ÄĚ singers and musicians before where at the beginning of the day, I perceived their performance as, well‚Ķ not great.

By the end of that day though, I found myself saying things to them like, ‚Äúvery good‚ÄĚ.

It’s not necessarily that the singer improved over the course of the day, but my ears adjusted to the level of their ability.

My ears changed over the course of the day.

On the other hand, I have worked with awesome singers that blew me away within the first 10 minutes of our session only to find myself later that day saying, ‚ÄúI think we can get that better‚ÄĚ.

Again, my ears changed over the course of the day.

Yours do too. Why when you’re mixing, why not reference something that you believe to be consistently good no matter where you are listening to it.

Referencing your mix gives you a chance to reset and center your ears.

Build workflows

I found over my years of mixing that if I mix what’s most important or what I want to hear the most in the mix, it tends to be louder. This is part of my workflow now. I just naturally mix¬†what needs to be loudest–last. It’s a workflow. It my mixes more consistent as a result of it.

I tend to use the same reverb settings almost every mix. I’ve also discovered that some of my favorite mixers do the same thing. why would you want to waste your brainpower I’ll coming up the next big reverb that probably sounds just like the last big reverb. Find the reverb you like, and save it as a preset better yet, at this into your template. These are all part of your workflow. It helps you be more consistent.

Meet your deadlines

No matter how good you are, if you can turn in a master too your artist or producer when you say you can, then you are considered To be inconsistent.”Well I would love for so-and-so to mix it, but there’s no telling when we begin the master back.

The way that most engineers brains are put together, we would probably mix on assault from now until Kingdom come. But in the real world, we live and die about what we turn in as finished.

No mix is ever really perfect, only perfect enough РKevin РClick to Tweet

I hope you find this helpful.  Do you have any tips on mixing more consistently? Please comment below

Learning How To Hear Compression

MixCoach

On this episode of the MixCoach Podcast Kevin discuses different techniques for learning how to hear compression, and what you can do to train your ear to hear how a compressor is reacting to a signal. 

Check out this episode to learn what tips Kevin has for learning to hear compression!


Enjoy the podcast and don’t forget to rate and subscribe to the MixCoach Podcast on iTunes¬†or Stitcher, and Review us!¬†
If you missed the last episode Click Here!

 

Show Notes:

Five Things Every Great Mixer Knows!

Click HERE to become a MixCoach Member today!

The Two Phases Of Writing Vocal Automation

MixCoach

On this episode of the podcast Kevin discuses his mindset while automating vocals. He talks about the two main phases of automating or “riding” vocal faders, and explains what he tries to accomplish in each stage.¬†

Check out this episode to find out more about vocal automation! 


Enjoy the podcast and don’t forget to rate and subscribe to the MixCoach Podcast on iTunes¬†or Stitcher, and Review us!¬†
If you missed the last episode Click Here!

 

Show Notes:

Two phases of automating vocals:

1) Keeping the vocal at a consistent level where you can hear it above the music.

2) Riding the vocal for intelligibility, so that you can clearly hear and understand every word.  

 

Links and Articles Mentioned:

Check out these links for more information on automating vocals, and the hierarchy of mixing.

MixCoach: The Hierarchy of Mixing 

MixCoach Minute 20: What is the correct order for Mixing? 

Kevin Interviews Joe Carrell

MixCoach

On this episode of the podcast, Kevin talks with Recording and Mix Engineer Joe Carrel. We discuss everything from gear and studio monitors to advice on ways to stay motivated and productive when mixing. Joe talks about his recent move from mixing out of his home studio to mixing at a commercial studio on Music Row, as well as some of the projects he has been working on. 

 


Show Notes:

Click here for more information about The MixCoach Experience Weekend coming up this September!

–¬†Warm Audio – WA76

– Tasji Bachman

РFind Joe’s Website HERE


Enjoy the podcast and don’t forget to rate and subscribe to the MixCoach Podcast on iTunes¬†or Stitcher, and Review us!¬†If you missed the last episode¬†Click Here!

Building Your Career With The Proximity Effect

MixCoach

On this episode of the podcast Kevin discuses the “Proximity Effect”… ¬†and no, it’s not about microphones or microphone placement. This kind of proximity effect has to do with your location or “proximity” to the industry, and how to use it to your advantage.

Check out this episode to learn what the proximity effect is, and why you need to know about it!

 

Enjoy the podcast and don’t forget to rate and subscribe to the MixCoach Podcast on iTunes¬†or Stitcher, and Review us!¬†If you missed the last episode¬†Click Here!

 

Show Notes:

Five Things Every Great Mixer Knows!

Click HERE to become a MixCoach Member today!

Could You Be Making Your Listener Look Bad?

MixCoach

On this episode of the podcast, Kevin discuses how you could be making your listener look bad without even knowing it. Check out this episode of the podcast to learn what you can do to avoid making your listener, and yourself, look bad.

 

Enjoy the podcast and don’t forget to rate and subscribe to the MixCoach Podcast on iTunes¬†or Stitcher, and Review us!¬†If you missed the last episode¬†Click Here!

 

Links Mentioned:

Five Things Every Great Mixer Knows!

Click HERE to become a MixCoach Member today!

Mixing Brass In World and Latin Music Styles

MixCoach

On this episode of the podcast we talk about how to mix brass in different styles of music. Kevin takes a question from a listener asking about how to mix brass instruments, as well as how mixing brass in Latin, World, or South American music styles might be different than mixing brass in rock or pop music. 

Show Notes:

If you are interested in learning more about mixing brass, check out The MixCoach Guide to Mixing Jazz and Big Band.

– Compare your mix to a good reference mix so you can hear what the brass in that style of music should sound like.

–¬†When mixing brass, one of the main things to consider is balance.

  • Make sure you can hear all of the parts well, paying particular attention to the vocal or instrument with the melody.
  • Support the melody part with all of the other parts.

 

Do you have any tips for mixing world or latin music? Let us know!

Enjoy the podcast and don’t forget to rate and subscribe to the MixCoach Podcast on iTunes¬†or Stitcher, and Review us!¬†If you missed the last episode¬†Click Here!

 

Links Mentioned:

Five Things Every Great Mixer Knows!

Click HERE to become a MixCoach Member today!

What To Do When Your Parallel Compression Sounds “Phasey”

On this episode of the podcast, Kevin answers a question from one of our subscribers asking about parallel processing, and a “whooshy” or “phasey” sound that happens when he uses parallel compression. Kevin¬†explains what causes these phase issues, and discusses a few simple ways to take care of it in your mixes.¬†

If you are not sure what phase is or would like to learn more about it, check out episode 71 of the MixCoach Podcast to learn How To Detect Phasing Problems In a Mix.

 

Show Notes:

Using parallel compression can add punch to drums, but can also cause phase problems if you aren’t careful.
Here are a couple of things you can do to help this:

1. Make sure you have delay compensation on on your DAW.

If you are a Pro Tools user and would like to learn more about Automatic Delay Compensation in Pro Tools, check out this great article on ptdudes.com called Delay Compensation Explained! РPart 1 and Part 2.  

2.  Turn up the delay compensation.

РOn my pro tools system, I can actually set the maximum amount of delay compensation in milliseconds or samples.  This phasey-ness you are getting could be caused from the system not being able to keep up with the amount of latency that your compressor of choice is causing.

3. Use a different compressor that does not cause as much delay.


Enjoy the podcast and don’t forget to rate and subscribe to the MixCoach Podcast on iTunes¬†or Stitcher, and Review us!¬†
If you missed the last episode Click Here!

Links Mentioned:

Five Things Every Great Mixer Knows!

Click HERE to become a MixCoach Member today!

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